youtube, study hall, college, education, social media marketing, content creation, youtuber, hank green,

YouTube launches Study Hall to allow people to earn college credits from the platform

Everyone already learns everything unofficially from YouTube. They just don’t have the qualifications to prove it. But could that change? YouTube thinks so, with the launch of its new Study Hall initiative.

Led by the friendly father of YouTube, Hank Green, who is taking a break from explaining where candle wax goes when you burn it, the Study Hall initiative aims to make college education more accessible to the masses, and when YouTube already has almost every bizarre topic covered, you might even get more choice than your nearest college curriculum.

As explained by YouTube: “Study Hall is a new approach that demystifies the college process while creating an affordable and accessible onramp to earning college credit. A postsecondary education drives economic and social mobility in powerful ways, yet the path to higher education can be riddled with barriers, including high cost and accessibility. We’re hoping to change that with Study Hall.”

“This suite encompasses the most common first-year college courses at many higher-education institutions: English Composition, College Math, US History and Human Communication. Developed and taught by the same faculty who conduct research and teach students on ASU’s campuses, the lessons combine ASU’s academic excellence with Crash Courses’s compelling storytelling — all on YouTube’s wide-reaching platform. Anyone can get started — no applications or minimum GPAs needed.”

Frankly, it’s about time more respected remote learning opportunities opened up like this.

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