Swiss gambling regulator grows its operator blacklist

10 more gambling websites have been added to the Inter-Cantonal Lotteries and Betting Commission (Comlot)‘s unlicensed operators blacklist in Switzerland.

The first list was published in September, after Geldspielgesetz – the country’s Federal Act on Real-Money Gaming – came into force. All-in-all, 87 unregulated sites in Switzerland are now named on this.

Through Geldspielgesetz, Switzerland’s gambling authorities can have internet service providers block unauthorised domains that are available in Switzerland but not regulated.

New additions 

Three of the latest operators to be blacklisted are Allsport365.com, Bahingo178.com and Buff.bet. Along with these, Coinbet24.com and Cryptobet.com have also been named.

Three of the Forzza brand’s sites have also been listed. These are Forzza1.com, Forzza2.com and Forzza3.com. Runbet.com, Solobet10.com and Winx24.com are other gambling sites that have been named.

Updates made to the blacklist

Since it was first published, this is the second time that Comlot has announced updates to the list.

The original version contained 65 operators in total. This included prominent names such as Interwetten, Betclic Everest Group and Unibet. This had an effect on affiliates with Swiss traffic promoting these brands.

An updated edition was announced in October. bet365.it was one of the biggest names to be listed this time around. Balkanbet.rs and Sportsbetting.ag were two other gambling sites to be blacklisted, while Africabet.co.zw also found its way onto there.

Changes to Swiss gambling 

Comlot’s blacklist is part of the country’s ongoing efforts to tighten iGaming regulation, which was voted for in a referendum back in June. Almost 73% of voters said they wanted new legislation to come in, from a turnout of 33.8%.

As part of these changes, offshore gambling operators were also set to be banned.

According to government statistics relevant at that time, it was found that Swiss players were spending around the equivalent of €215 million on unauthorised foreign gambling sites.