Rehab Bingo rebrands after ASA sanctions

Broadway Gaming has made the decision to change the name of one of its brands, on the back of a UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) ruling.

Following a single complaint, the ASA challenged whether the name Rehab Bingo “condoned socially irresponsible gambling behaviour that could lead to financial, social or emotional harm”. It has now become Rosy Bingo.

The ASA also looked at whether the brand Rehab Bingo suggests that “gambling could provide an escape from personal problems”.

Rehab Bingo was launched by the Rehab Group Charity to fundraise for its own activities.

In its assessment, the ASA cited the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) Code that states ads must not condone or encourage gambling behaviour that is socially irresponsible of could lead to financial, social or emotional harm.

The name Rehab Bingo appeared throughout the brand’s site, RehabBingo.co.uk, while a paid-for search advert on Google also stated ‘Join Official Rehab Bingo Now’.

In addition the ASA also ruled on a Pink Casino advert for a “free game,” that was deemed misleading due to the fact a cost was involved.

Relating to an email titled “100% Losses Back + Free Scratchcard,” text regarding an offer for a free Deal or No Deal scratchcard game stated “One Free Game! Don’t forget to also claim your free Deal or No Deal scratchcard! No deposit required, just opt in with code DEAL and start scratching!**”

With the asterisks explained at the foot of the email, “Offer only available to those in receipt of this email. Opt in with code DEAL before 23:59 Sunday 30th July. Free scratchcard will be awarded as £1 bonus with 10x wagering requirement”.

The complainant challenged the “free” nature of the offer, due to having their cash winnings from elsewhere on the website taken as part of the scratchcard’s wagering requirements after opting in.

An issue that was upheld by the ASA, who ruled that the ad must not appeal again in its current form and informed Pink Casino “not to claim that their promotions were ‘free’ if there was a cost involved in taking advantage of the offer.”